Monday, May 25, 2020

Uncovering a Relationship Between Alcohol and Violence...

Correlation research reveals a pattern between two variables that have been measured several times. To uncover a relationship between alcohol and violence, I would use the correlation research. Using naturalistic observation, I would observe public intoxication at common bars or clubs, and involve accessible records of already convicted violent offenders that acknowledge the use of alcohol. I would choose this method because I believe this would be an abundant amount of knowledge that could properly disclose a correlation, weather positive or negative, between alcohol and violence, and present a strong or weak number that predicts the correlation thus making this research method the most viable. Although this data may display a†¦show more content†¦This shock, this anxiety, the perturbed emotion were negative reinforcements for me not to break the law again, not to mention the monetary value. The target behavior that the police officer would be reinforcing is for me to b e in submission to the governing laws of the state of Tennessee. A positive reinforcement occurs when an affirmative action encourages a satisfactory behavior in a person’s environment. An illustration of positive reinforcement in my life comes from my marriage. My spouse brings me flowers home from work or other tokens of love, he sends me encouraging messages during each day, and continuously applauds my duties of wife and mother. These positive reinforcements on me and my environment safeguards and nourishes our relationship by maintaining a positive self image of my roles or identities in the marriage. The target behavior for our marriage would be a healthy, active and happy union. Shaping, according to our text book, is results from the reinforcement of successive approximations to a final desired behavior, in my two examples would be a law abiding, happy wife. Behavioral theory or behaviorism fits with my thoughts of psychology. Just like John Watson (1878-1958) thought that the goal of scientific psychology should be to predict or control behavior in ways that may benefit our society, according to our Psychology text book, I also believe the goal of psychology should be toShow MoreRelatedA Review of Coping Skills for Early Sexual Abuse Victims8961 Words   |  36 PagesRe-Victimization†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦18-19 What positive coping skills are associated with early sexual trauma? --------------20 How do positive coping skills help early sexual abuse victims? ---------------------20-23 How coping strategies mediate the relationship between childhood sexual abuse victims adult adjustment.----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------23 Chapter 3: Method†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦23 Purpose of Study†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦Ã¢â‚¬ ¦ 23-24 Read MoreLogical Reasoning189930 Words   |  760 Pages............................................................................................................ 40 Deductively Valid and Inductively Strong....................................................................................... 43 Uncovering Implicit Premises ............................................................................................................ 46 Locating Unstated Conclusions ...................................................................................Read MoreMarketing Management130471 Words   |  522 PagesPublic relations Understanding individual consumer behaviour Understanding industrial consumer behaviour Customer satisfaction Customer relationship management Marketing of services Rural marketing Types of marketing research Process of marketing research Tools and Techniques of marketing research Applications of marketing research Preparation of marketing research report Online marketing E-commerce Trends in marketing Page No. Marketing management – an introduction Unit structure: 1. 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Thursday, May 14, 2020

Major Causes And Consequences Of The American Civil War

Eric Fung Mr. Ferretti APUSH 16 September 2015 1). Historical Causation (Cause and Effect): CE Explain the major causes and consequences of the American Civil War. In general, the American Civil War is thought to have started mostly because of a discrepancy on how to handle slavery. The difference in opinion is most likely a result of political, economic, and religious tension within the country. Before a civil war was even thought about, southern leaders spoke of freeing their slaves and many predicted the demise of slavery due to a lack of efficiency. In 1793 with Eli Whitney’s cotton gin, cotton soon became the most popular southern crop leading to a revival of interest in slavery. With cotton, the south gained a large amount of profit and this benefitted northern shippers while Great Britain also depended on this cotton. Thus the Cotton Kingdom which developed at least half of the world’s cotton grew and gave cotton growers much power (The American Pageant 350-351). While slaves became popular again, they still basically had no political or civil rights (359). Eventually, certain groups realized that the ethical rights of the slaves were being violated and abolitionist groups as well as antislavery societies came about (362). Eventually, in response to the anti-slavery, slave owners responded by justifying slavery with the Bible as well as Aristotle (365). With this began the split between pro-slavery and anti-slavery sections of America, mostly a split between theShow MoreRelatedThe American Civil War878 Words   |  4 PagesIntroduction A civil war is a prolonged high-intensity conflict between people, countries, or parties, which is usually barefaced and armed. Every war has its causes either acceptable or not and some are inevitable. Commonly, civil wars are between countries within a state. It results from one country aiming to make implementations on their governing policies or take control of certain areas within the state. 1Civil War refers to the American Civil War, which took place in the year 1861 to 1865Read MoreIn What Way the African Americans Shaped the Course and Consequences of the Civil War? Confine Your Answer to the Years from 1861 and 1870.1038 Words   |  5 PagesIn what way the African Americans shaped the course and consequences of the Civil War? Confine your answer to the years from 1861 and 1870. Immediately after the election and inauguration of Abraham Lincoln, the newly-established Republican Party’s presidential nominee, eleven states of the South seceded from the Union. These events marked the beginning of the Civil War and the war was a result of many political tensions that had emerged between the North and the South in the prior decades, allRead MoreTime Line 21050 Words   |  5 PagesPeople/Event(s) to American History in column C. See complete instructions in the Syllabus for the Module 3 assignment entitled. â€Å"Timeline Part II.† NOTE: The timeline project does not need to be submitted to turnitin. NOTE: Please write your answers in a clear and concise manner. Limit your submission of the Timeline Part II up to 250 words per topic/subtopic. For example, if a topic is divided into 3 subtopics, you may write a maximum of 250 per subtopic listed. Be sure to cite all sources. Major Event/EpochRead MoreCivil War : Causes And Consequences962 Words   |  4 PagesCIVIL WAR – Causes and Consequences The word war in itself is a very unpleasant term signifying trauma, death and destruction. It is the epitome of human selfishness and cruelty. Ever since the existence has been known, people have been fighting against each other for various issues, ranging from small family matters to the huge international issues. Having said that, we need to keep in mind that every war needs a trigger that leads to a very devastating consequence once it ends. There have beenRead MoreThe War Of The Civil War964 Words   |  4 PagesThere wasn’t one sole cause of the Civil War but there were many events that took the country to war and put brother against brother and states against states. Abraham Lincoln wanted to preserve the union and that could only be attained by civil war. Slavery which was an underlying cause for the war played its role in the division that divided the North against the South. Ultimately the preservation of the union, slavery and the consequences and conflicts leading to the Civil War all rested on PresidentRead MoreThe Rise Of The Civil War1096 Words   |  5 Pagesof the 1850 s were the years leading up to Civil War in which many events took place that changed America. Many factors contributed to influencing the Civil War. The three major factors leading up to the Civil War were the Fugitive Slave Act, the Kansas- Nebraska Act, and the anti-slavery violence of John Brown. All of these significant events changed American in either one way or another. Growing tensions between the North and the South led to major factors during the 1850s. The Fugitive SlaveRead MoreThe Civil War Of The United States1605 Words   |  7 PagesThe Civil War of the United States was a major and influential event in the history of our country. The Civil War shaped our nation and how we think of liberty in general. Such a big event in our antiquity must have been caused by a series of dominant events. However, a War of this size has many effects to go along with it. T he most common effect thought of is the freedom of slaves, however, the Civil War was not just a war fought for freedom. One major cause of the Civil War was the issue of slaveryRead MoreThe American Revolution: Sowing the Seeds for the Civil War1587 Words   |  6 PagesThe American Revolution: Sowing the Seeds for the Civil War The time of the American Revolution was the most critical period of time in all of American history. This was a period of time in which the foundation of our nation was set down: a strong foundation will lead us to greatness, a weak foundation will not. Along the path, if a part of the foundation crumbles or falls, it will take immense energy to fix it, and even if it heals, it heals with an ugly scar, a mark in our history. The mistakesRead MoreRace And Reunion : The Civil War1581 Words   |  7 Pagessouth. Striving for a reunion, a majority of American white communities close obscure the civil war racial narrative would only fade. In race and reunion: The Civil War in American memory, by David Blight, represents how Americans chose to remember the Civil War conflict, from the beginning of the turning point of the war. The two major themes race and reunion, demonstrate how white Americans adjusted and altered the causes and outcomes of the Civil War to reflect their particular i deas regardingRead MoreIndustrial Revolution After The Civil War956 Words   |  4 Pages The Inusterial Revolution after the Civil War Between 18-19th centuries after the Civil War, a chain of events occurred that brought about several changes in the way that people lived and worked in the United States.This period ranges from the time when cities started growing rapidly because human hand labor was drastically changed to machine labor. These events started the American Industrial Revolution, which later affected African American socially, economically and politically. However, many

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

A Dual Court System Essay - 976 Words

History of Courts Many years ago, before courts existed matters was handled in a privately or informally. This often led to violence and unjust treatment of innocent people. During the rise of the Greek City States and the Roman Empire law enforcement became a public affair instead of private. (Siegel, Schmalleger, Worral, 2011). Along with this movement became formalized courts and other criminal justice institutions. This allowed for law enforcement matters to be handled in a more civilized manner for resolving human conflict. However in the United States we have what is referred to as a dual court system. A dual court system can be defined as a judicial system comprising federal- and state- level judicial systems. A dual court system separates federal and state courts. According to the book a dual court system is advantageous and desirable because it is parallel to federalism. Federalism is a system of government where power is constitutionally divided between central governing body and various co nstituent units. In the United States, the federal government makes laws, but federalism also gives the state’s power to make their own laws (Siegel, Schmalleger, Worral, 2011). The Founding fathers saw it as a way to serve as check on an abusive or tyrannical government. Common Law Common law became into effect after the Norman Conquest (A.D. 1066) consolidated their hold on newly won territory. One way was to take control over the legal/court systems. When this happenShow MoreRelatedEssay Dual Court System1094 Words   |  5 PagesQ1. What is the dual-court system? Why do we have a dual court system? A. The dual-court system is the result of a general a agreement among the nations founders about the need for individual states to retain significant legislative authority and judicial autonomy separate from federal control. The reason why we have a dual-court system is, back then; new states joining the union were assured of limited federal intervention into local affairs. The state legislatures were freeRead MoreCourt Systems1203 Words   |  5 PagesCourt System Introduction The purpose of this paper is to make the reader aware about the significance of the history of judicial system prevailing within the premises of United States. This paper intends to explore the Court System of United States. The major historical developments in the courts of United States will be discussed. Moreover, the rationale of the dual court system of the United States will be outlined. This paper will also explore the correlation between the historical developmentsRead MoreCrjs300 Theory and Practice in Courts1084 Words   |  5 PagesUnit 3: Theory and Practice in Courts Stacey Pedroza CRJS300-1203A-04: Proseminar in Criminal Justice Professor Samantha Carlo AIU Online University June 24, 2012 Theory and Practice in Courts In reviewing the court system of the United States there is a definite hierarchy between the trial courts, appellate courts and the supreme courts of both the state and federal levels. However, the actions of the court systems move at such a slow and hindered pace because of the bureaucracy ofRead MoreThe Court System Of The United States1071 Words   |  5 PagesThe courts play a huge role in the criminal justice system. The dual court system of the United States (U.S.) was established through the U.S. constitution. The court systems have a multiple purposes and elements of court. Federal and state court system is what makes up the dual court system of the U.S. Today the U.S. court system is what it is today because of previous legal codes, common law, and the precedent it played in the past. Making the U.S. court system a vital role in the criminal justiceRead MoreHistory of the US Court System1233 Words   |  5 PagesMajor Historical Developments in U.S. Courts Introduction Today, the court system in the United States is comprised of a vast and far-flung network of state and federal courts that adjudicate millions of cases each year, but this dual court system has not always been in place. The dual court system of federal and state courts that is in place today is the result of a number of historical developments in the U.S. courts over the years. This paper provides a review of the relevant literature toRead MoreCourt History and Purpose873 Words   |  4 PagesTERESA MORALES Court History and Purpose People in the United States attend court every day for different many reasons. Those reasons could be for traffic violations, civil law suits, or for unlawful criminal acts. No matter what they are all handled and disputed in a court of law. Courts are empowered to make fair and binding decisions upon the facts that are received. There are two types of courts; civil court and criminal court. It is very important that people understandRead MoreCourt Systems1096 Words   |  5 Pagesnations legal system should work, they were determined we should have a country that operated differently and more effectively than the one left behind in the days of British control. They decided that states should have the power to make and govern their own laws and also the ability to enforce those laws. This did not eliminate the need for federal court systems, however, and so the dual court system was born. The dual court system is the formal name for the way our countrys legal system works. Read MoreThe Historical Development of the US Court System816 Words   |  3 PagesDescribe the Historical Development of the US Court System Over the last 224 years, the US court system has been continually evolving. At the heart of these changes, is the belief that the Constitution establishes basic practices that must be followed at all times. This has led to the development of a legal structure that is based on case precedent and oversight (which are augmented with constitutional ideas). The combination of these factors has meant that the judicial branch is continually transformingRead MoreThe Supreme Law Of The Federal Court System Essay1292 Words   |  6 PagesUnited States the court-system operates as a dual-court system. The responsibilities of the State and Federal Courts share the responsibility of determining law based on specific jurisdictions. The principle of federalism was born out of the necessity to balance the powers of the states by creating a federal government whose authority constituted the supreme law of the land. Proponents of court reform have been looking for court unification to streamline t he judiciary system to combine overlappingRead MoreCja/224 Court History and Purpose Paper1201 Words   |  5 PagesCourt History and Purpose. The courts are a critical component of American criminal justice because they determine what should happen to people charged with violating the law. Courts are important beyond criminal justice, too. Disputes that arise between private parties, businesses, government officials, and the like are brought to court in order to ensure that they are heard, ideally, in a neutral forum (Siegel, Schmalleger, Worrall, 2011). Succeeding in liberation and independence is difficult

Tuesday, May 5, 2020

Holocaust (2284 words) Essay Example For Students

Holocaust (2284 words) Essay HolocaustThe Lebensborn ProjectThe topic of eugenics cannot be discussed without encountering the Holocaust, but this is as it should be. When contemporary geneticists, genetics counselors and clinical geneticists wonder why it is that genetics receives special attention from those concerned with ethics, the answer is simple and can be found in history. The events which led to the sterilization, torture and murder of millions of Jews, Gypsies, Slavs and children of mixed racial heritage in the years just before and during the era of the Third Reich in Germany were rooted firmly in the science of genetics (Muller-Hill, 1988). Rooted not in fringe, lunatic science but in the mainstream of reputable genetics in what was indisputably the most advanced scientific and technological society of its day. The pursuit of genetic purity in the name of public health led directly to Dachau, Treblinka, Ravensbruck and Auschwitz. As early as 1931 influential geneticists such as Fritz Lenz were refer ring to National Socialism as applied biology in their textbooks (Caplan, 1992). As difficult as it is for many contemporary scientists to accept (Caplan, 1992; Kater, 1992), mainstream science provided a good deal of enthusiastic scientific support for the virulent racism that fueled the killing machine of the Third Reich. When the Nazis came to power they were obsessed with securing the racial purity of the German people. The medical and biomedical communities in Germany not only endorsed this concern with negative eugenics, they had fostered it. Racial hygiene swept through German biology, public health, medicine and anthropology in the 1920s and 1930s, long before the Nazis came to power (Weiss, 1987, Muller-Hill, 1988; Proctor, 1988; Kater, 1992). Many in the medical profession urged the Nazi leadership to undertake social policies that might lead to enhancing or increasing the genetic fitness of the German people (Kater, 1992). Eugenics consumed the German medical, biological and social scientific communities in the decade before World War II. Many physicians and scientists were frantic about threats they saw to the genetic health of the nation posed by the presence of inferior populations such as Jews, Gypsies, and Slavs, with a lesser extent a distant threat which was, African peoples (Adams, 1990). The steps they took to protect against the public health disaster of a polluted racial stock were so awful, so immoral, and so heinous that they have rightly, shaped all subsequent discussion of the ethics of both human genetics and eugenics. Steps to eliminate unfit or undesirable genes by prohibitions on sexual relations, restrictions on marriage, sterilization or killing, are all forms of negative population eugenics (Kevles, 1995). Nazi judges and scientists ordered children killed or sterilized who had parents of different racial backgrounds or were thought to have genetic predispositions toward mental illness, alcoholism, retardation or other disabili ties. This was done to remove the threat such children posed to the genetic stock of the nation and to avoid having to pay the costs associated with institutionalization and hospitalization (Caplan, 1992). Laws were enacted prohibiting marriages between those whom Nazi race hygiene theory held were likely to produce degenerate offspring. Conversely, on a smaller scale, the Nazis tried to encourage those who satisfied Nazi racial ideals to have more children. The most extreme form of encouraging eugenic mating was the Lebensborn program which gave money, medals, housing and other rewards to persuade ideal mothers and fathers to have large numbers of children in order to create a super-race of Aryan children (Proctor, 1988). The provision of rewards, incentives and benefits to encourage the increased representation of certain genes in the gene pool of future generations constitutes positive population eugenics (Kevles, 1995). Nazi race hygiene theories were false. There is no evidence to support the biological views of the inherent inferiority of races or the biological superiority of specific ethnic groups, which underlay the eugenics efforts of the Third Reich. There is not even any firm basis for differentiating groups into races on the basis of genetics (Harding, 1993). The negative eugenics programs race hygiene spawned were not only patently unethical, since they were completely involuntary and coercive they were also based upon assumptions about genes and race that are not true. The Nazi drive to design future generations based on what can now be understood as invalid science skewed by racism led to concentration camps, forced sterilization, infanticide and genocide. Ethical debates about eugenics must acknowledge the horrors perpetrated in the name of eugenics in this century. But, despite the evil that has been done in the name of eugenics the debate cannot end there. The moral permissibility of eugenic goals must be addressed, in its own terms. For whi le arguments based upon history are instructive and important, those who see no analogies between our times and earlier times are unlikely to find warnings about the past sufficiently forceful to shape future behavior or public policy (Caplan, 1992; 1994). And while the fear of the imposition of eugenic programs by a totalitarian regime must be taken seriously it is not the only path eugenics might follow. Improvement of the genetic makeup of a population can be sought through negative or positive eugenics. What is less widely noted is that either strategy can be pursued at the level of individuals and their direct, lineal offspring or for large groups or populations. Efforts aimed at improving or enhancing the properties of large-scale populations such as by providing incentives for large numbers of individuals with particular traits or abilities to marry and have many children or encouraging public health testing for neural tube defects constitute versions of population eugenics. The goals of such activities are to shift the makeup of the gene pool of future generations in particular directions. Positive and negative eugenics can also be carried out by individual couples who are not interested in nor motivated by the overall effect of their actions may have on the societal gene pool. Population eugenics need not be coercive but, historically, it almost always has been. A great deal of social pressure was applied in the German Lebensborn programs of the 1940s. More recent efforts to shift the genetic norms of populations exemplified by the attempt to encourage those with the right racial makeup to reproduce as is evident in the ethnically selective pronatalist policies espoused by governments in many parts of the world are less obviously coercive but still involve a great deal of cultural and societal pressure. The stated policies of some religious bodies such as certain Orthodox Jewish sects or some elements of the Greek Orthodox church that they will not bl ess marriages where no genetic testing for diseases has been done constitute examples of possible coercion for population eugenic goals by non-governmental powers. The day when we need to decide whether it is wrong to choose the genetic makeup of our children is not very far off. Some argue that we lack the wisdom to choose well (Lewontin, 1992). But, that hardly stops parents today from seeking to better the lot of their children through environmentally mediated efforts at enhancement. In a society that places so much emphasis on maximizing opportunities and achieving the most efficient use of resources it is hard to believe that pressures will not quickly arise on prospective parents to use genetic information and techniques for manipulating genes to better the lot of their children or of future generations of children. For some, the historical abuses committed in this century in the name of eugenics are sufficient grounds for prohibiting or banning any efforts at any form of euge nics; positive or negative; individual or group. However, negative population eugenics is not individual positive eugenics. If most people agree that parents have a right if not a duty to try and maximize the well-being and happiness of their offspring, then it is not likely that the record of historical abuses carried out in the name of negative population eugenics will hinder efforts to incorporate genetic information into procreative decisions about our children and their immediate descendants. As it stands today, most parents, particularly those in the middle and upper classes, would probably be more troubled by failing to use genetic information to try and improve the lot of their offspring then they would by doing so. PATRIOTISM EssayThe lesson might be that the creation of a super race as planned by Himmler and Hitler was a terribly demented idea, indicative of the extent of their obsession with Aryan superiority and Nazi supremacy. The terrible results of Nazi Germany continue to reverberate even today, the evidence can be found in the shattered lives of the Lebensborn children. Despite modern assumptions that, American interest in eugenics waned during the 1920s, researchers said sterilization laws had authorized the neutering of more than 40,000 people classified as insane ore feebleminded in thirty states by 1944. Another 22,000 underwent sterilization between the mid 1940s and 1963, despite weakening public support and revelations of Nazi atrocities. Forced sterilization was once legal in eighteen U.S. states, and most states with eugenics allowed people to be sterilized without their consent by leaving the decision to a third party. Theater

Friday, April 10, 2020

Virginia Woolfs Modernism Essay Example For Students

Virginia Woolfs Modernism Essay Virginia Woolf is regarded as one of the most significant authors of the modernist period. She experimented with different techniques, forms and structures and it is this experimentation and introduction of a new style that defines her as a modernist writer. Modernism was a cultural movement over the turn of the 19th and 20th centuries that was not only in literature but in art, music and architecture. It was a rejection of the traditional, conventional past and embodied experimentation and the challenging of established conventions. There were many factors that lead to the establishment of modernist characteristics such as WWI, Sigmund Freuds theory on psychoanalysis, Charles Darwins Theory of Evolution and the Industrial Revolution. These introduced a new way of thinking which was ideas of existentialism, the subconscious, and the sense of a lonely, isolated individual trying to make sense of a fragmented and almost alien society. I will explore these ideas further in this essay with discussion of how Virginia Woolf represents a modernist writer by using the following points. We will write a custom essay on Virginia Woolfs Modernism specifically for you for only $16.38 $13.9/page Order now Virginia Woolf was influenced by events and developments to challenge the classic writing conventions, and Virginia Woolf not only used the conventions of the modernist period but developed them further. Virginia Woolf was influenced by events and developments to challenge the classic writing conventions. In the previous literary period, writers spoke in a third person omniscient voice with patriarchal values, religion and a clear unchangeable social hierarchy present. Sigmund Freuds theory of psychoanalysis was not the first but was the one that became popular and well-known around the world. Virginia Woolf became inspired by the writing of Freud and therefore incorporated the exploration of the subconscious and the underlying psychological and emotional motives of characters in her writings. The facets of Freudian aspects that Woolf mainly focuses on are especially evident through her use of stream of consciousness, where the thoughts and feelings of a character are written simply as a jumble of thoughts that however are still connected. The syntax gives a long flow of sentences and continuous access into the characters mind which, before this time, was not done. An example of this is in Woolfs novel Mrs Dalloway where it is narrated through the point of view of what is happening inside the characters minds. Another major event of the time was WWI. This novel is based post-WWI and consequently reflects the insecurities felt after this war. For example, in Mrs Dalloway Woolf writes in such a way that produces confusion for the reader, especially through the lack of closure in the novel leaving the reader more uncertain. Woolf also directly focuses on the war and its unsettling consequences in Mrs Dalloway as she talks about how a boy was killed and now his Manor House must go to a cousin. The traditional English hierarchy has been disturbed and the war has directly damaged their conventional world. This changing of conventions is a key factor of modernist writing. Another major occurrence in the modernist period that Virginia Woolf took inspiration from was the technological advancements which were the first stages of globalisation. The invention of the wireless and other communications made people feel so much smaller in contrast to the huge and growing world. This idea is emphasised by the discovery of other galaxies, playing with peoples conceptions of time and space. Ideas about time and space play a major role in modernist writing and the writings of Virginia Woolf are no different. In her novel Mrs Dalloway all the action happens over the course of one day. Novels before this time took much longer for the plot to unfold, from weeks to even decades. However Woolf also incorporates flashbacks which play with the idea of time further producing an unnerving effect from this change of tenses. The effect of Woolfs short time frame is that it varies with the readers expectations of the novel and changes the way they look upon the passing of time. .u7728c06665f3ecca0e548053ff2cd5c2 , .u7728c06665f3ecca0e548053ff2cd5c2 .postImageUrl , .u7728c06665f3ecca0e548053ff2cd5c2 .centered-text-area { min-height: 80px; position: relative; } .u7728c06665f3ecca0e548053ff2cd5c2 , .u7728c06665f3ecca0e548053ff2cd5c2:hover , .u7728c06665f3ecca0e548053ff2cd5c2:visited , .u7728c06665f3ecca0e548053ff2cd5c2:active { border:0!important; } .u7728c06665f3ecca0e548053ff2cd5c2 .clearfix:after { content: ""; display: table; clear: both; } .u7728c06665f3ecca0e548053ff2cd5c2 { display: block; transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; width: 100%; opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #95A5A6; } .u7728c06665f3ecca0e548053ff2cd5c2:active , .u7728c06665f3ecca0e548053ff2cd5c2:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #2C3E50; } .u7728c06665f3ecca0e548053ff2cd5c2 .centered-text-area { width: 100%; position: relative ; } .u7728c06665f3ecca0e548053ff2cd5c2 .ctaText { border-bottom: 0 solid #fff; color: #2980B9; font-size: 16px; font-weight: bold; margin: 0; padding: 0; text-decoration: underline; } .u7728c06665f3ecca0e548053ff2cd5c2 .postTitle { color: #FFFFFF; font-size: 16px; font-weight: 600; margin: 0; padding: 0; width: 100%; } .u7728c06665f3ecca0e548053ff2cd5c2 .ctaButton { background-color: #7F8C8D!important; color: #2980B9; border: none; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: none; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; line-height: 26px; moz-border-radius: 3px; text-align: center; text-decoration: none; text-shadow: none; width: 80px; min-height: 80px; background: url(https://artscolumbia.org/wp-content/plugins/intelly-related-posts/assets/images/simple-arrow.png)no-repeat; position: absolute; right: 0; top: 0; } .u7728c06665f3ecca0e548053ff2cd5c2:hover .ctaButton { background-color: #34495E!important; } .u7728c06665f3ecca0e548053ff2cd5c2 .centered-text { display: table; height: 80px; padding-left : 18px; top: 0; } .u7728c06665f3ecca0e548053ff2cd5c2 .u7728c06665f3ecca0e548053ff2cd5c2-content { display: table-cell; margin: 0; padding: 0; padding-right: 108px; position: relative; vertical-align: middle; width: 100%; } .u7728c06665f3ecca0e548053ff2cd5c2:after { content: ""; display: block; clear: both; } READ: The Influence of Modernist Art EssayAnother interesting aspect is that the novel, instead of focusing on the unfolding of events, focuses on the characters and their thoughts and impressions of everything around them. This again relates both to the short time frame and also the stream of consciousness that Woolf uses in many of her writings, and is a key theme of modernist writing. Virginia Woolf was influenced by events and developments to challenge the classic writing conventions. Virginia Woolf not only used the conventions of the modernist period but developed them further. She was one of the first modernist writers so society took notice of her as a radical writer challenging the boundaries of writing. This was because her writing style and novel structure was different to what was previously used, for example the use of the short time frame and stream of consciousness allowing access into the readers head. These conventions had not been used before so Woolf was noticed as the author who moved the world into a new, radical, less traditional era. Woolf developed the conventions of the modernist period as her style changed subtly through each new novel that was published. The main way that this occurred in was that Virginia Woolf created inspiring impressions on her readers rather than recreating reality, and she experimented with her writing rather than conforming. Another example of how Woolf developed the conventions of the modernist period further is that she explores aspects of society that were issues at the time. She took inspiration from previous female authors such as Jane Austen and the Bronte sisters and examined women and their struggles in society. An example of this in her literary work is her creation of William Shakespeares sister, a woman named Judith. Woolf incorporated this into her extended essay A Room of Ones Own to try to get her point across about womens need for independence. Gender issues is one of Woolfs themes common to her works, along with the hierarchy of society and the consequences of war, as discussed in her novel Mrs Dalloway. The final way in which Virginia Woolf developed the conventions of the modernist period further is how she reflects her personal life within her work. Woolf had a nervous breakdown at age 13 after the death of her parents and from then on she was battling a mental illness for most of her life. This is incorporated in her work in her novel Mrs Dalloway where she incorporates most likely the experiences of herself into the character Septimus Smith who was shell-shocked from the war. Woolf imagined her novel Mrs Dalloway as a study of insanity and suicide; the world seen by the sane and the insane side by side. Mental illnesses were not something that were well known and widely accepted in Virginia Woolfs context, and Woolfs incorporation of this in her writings progressed the modernist era by the introduction of a new issue discussed. In these ways, Virginia Woolf not only used the conventions of the modernist period but developed them further. In this essay I have discussed the ways in which Virginia Woolf is regarded as one of the most significant authors of the modernist period using the two points that Virginia Woolf was influenced by events and developments to challenge the classic writing conventions, and Virginia Woolf not only used the conventions of the modernist period but developed them further. Virginia Woolfs Modernism Essay Example For Students Virginia Woolfs Modernism Essay Virginia Woolf is regarded as one of the most significant authors of the modernist period. She experimented with different techniques, forms and structures and it is this experimentation and introduction of a new style that defines her as a modernist writer. Modernism was a cultural movement over the turn of the 19th and 20th centuries that was not only in literature but in art, music and architecture. It was a rejection of the traditional, conventional past and embodied experimentation and the challenging of established conventions. There were many factors that lead to the establishment of modernist characteristics such as WWI, Sigmund Freuds theory on psychoanalysis, Charles Darwins Theory of Evolution and the Industrial Revolution. These introduced a new way of thinking which was ideas of existentialism, the subconscious, and the sense of a lonely, isolated individual trying to make sense of a fragmented and almost alien society. I will explore these ideas further in this essay with discussion of how Virginia Woolf represents a modernist writer by using the following points. We will write a custom essay on Virginia Woolfs Modernism specifically for you for only $16.38 $13.9/page Order now Virginia Woolf was influenced by events and developments to challenge the classic writing conventions, and Virginia Woolf not only used the conventions of the modernist period but developed them further. Virginia Woolf was influenced by events and developments to challenge the classic writing conventions. In the previous literary period, writers spoke in a third person omniscient voice with patriarchal values, religion and a clear unchangeable social hierarchy present. Sigmund Freuds theory of psychoanalysis was not the first but was the one that became popular and well-known around the world. Virginia Woolf became inspired by the writing of Freud and therefore incorporated the exploration of the subconscious and the underlying psychological and emotional motives of characters in her writings. The facets of Freudian aspects that Woolf mainly focuses on are especially evident through her use of stream of consciousness, where the thoughts and feelings of a character are written simply as a jumble of thoughts that however are still connected. The syntax gives a long flow of sentences and continuous access into the characters mind which, before this time, was not done. An example of this is in Woolfs novel Mrs Dalloway where it is narrated through the point of view of what is happening inside the characters minds. Another major event of the time was WWI. This novel is based post-WWI and consequently reflects the insecurities felt after this war. For example, in Mrs Dalloway Woolf writes in such a way that produces confusion for the reader, especially through the lack of closure in the novel leaving the reader more uncertain. Woolf also directly focuses on the war and its unsettling consequences in Mrs Dalloway as she talks about how a boy was killed and now his Manor House must go to a cousin. The traditional English hierarchy has been disturbed and the war has directly damaged their conventional world. This changing of conventions is a key factor of modernist writing. Another major occurrence in the modernist period that Virginia Woolf took inspiration from was the technological advancements which were the first stages of globalisation. The invention of the wireless and other communications made people feel so much smaller in contrast to the huge and growing world. This idea is emphasised by the discovery of other galaxies, playing with peoples conceptions of time and space. Ideas about time and space play a major role in modernist writing and the writings of Virginia Woolf are no different. In her novel Mrs Dalloway all the action happens over the course of one day. Novels before this time took much longer for the plot to unfold, from weeks to even decades. However Woolf also incorporates flashbacks which play with the idea of time further producing an unnerving effect from this change of tenses. The effect of Woolfs short time frame is that it varies with the readers expectations of the novel and changes the way they look upon the passing of time. .u1c007653b19f3f0a612eff59516e9010 , .u1c007653b19f3f0a612eff59516e9010 .postImageUrl , .u1c007653b19f3f0a612eff59516e9010 .centered-text-area { min-height: 80px; position: relative; } .u1c007653b19f3f0a612eff59516e9010 , .u1c007653b19f3f0a612eff59516e9010:hover , .u1c007653b19f3f0a612eff59516e9010:visited , .u1c007653b19f3f0a612eff59516e9010:active { border:0!important; } .u1c007653b19f3f0a612eff59516e9010 .clearfix:after { content: ""; display: table; clear: both; } .u1c007653b19f3f0a612eff59516e9010 { display: block; transition: background-color 250ms; webkit-transition: background-color 250ms; width: 100%; opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #95A5A6; } .u1c007653b19f3f0a612eff59516e9010:active , .u1c007653b19f3f0a612eff59516e9010:hover { opacity: 1; transition: opacity 250ms; webkit-transition: opacity 250ms; background-color: #2C3E50; } .u1c007653b19f3f0a612eff59516e9010 .centered-text-area { width: 100%; position: relative ; } .u1c007653b19f3f0a612eff59516e9010 .ctaText { border-bottom: 0 solid #fff; color: #2980B9; font-size: 16px; font-weight: bold; margin: 0; padding: 0; text-decoration: underline; } .u1c007653b19f3f0a612eff59516e9010 .postTitle { color: #FFFFFF; font-size: 16px; font-weight: 600; margin: 0; padding: 0; width: 100%; } .u1c007653b19f3f0a612eff59516e9010 .ctaButton { background-color: #7F8C8D!important; color: #2980B9; border: none; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: none; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; line-height: 26px; moz-border-radius: 3px; text-align: center; text-decoration: none; text-shadow: none; width: 80px; min-height: 80px; background: url(https://artscolumbia.org/wp-content/plugins/intelly-related-posts/assets/images/simple-arrow.png)no-repeat; position: absolute; right: 0; top: 0; } .u1c007653b19f3f0a612eff59516e9010:hover .ctaButton { background-color: #34495E!important; } .u1c007653b19f3f0a612eff59516e9010 .centered-text { display: table; height: 80px; padding-left : 18px; top: 0; } .u1c007653b19f3f0a612eff59516e9010 .u1c007653b19f3f0a612eff59516e9010-content { display: table-cell; margin: 0; padding: 0; padding-right: 108px; position: relative; vertical-align: middle; width: 100%; } .u1c007653b19f3f0a612eff59516e9010:after { content: ""; display: block; clear: both; } READ: Modernism in British and Irish literature EssayAnother interesting aspect is that the novel, instead of focusing on the unfolding of events, focuses on the characters and their thoughts and impressions of everything around them. This again relates both to the short time frame and also the stream of consciousness that Woolf uses in many of her writings, and is a key theme of modernist writing. Virginia Woolf was influenced by events and developments to challenge the classic writing conventions. Virginia Woolf not only used the conventions of the modernist period but developed them further. She was one of the first modernist writers so society took notice of her as a radical writer challenging the boundaries of writing. This was because her writing style and novel structure was different to what was previously used, for example the use of the short time frame and stream of consciousness allowing access into the readers head. These conventions had not been used before so Woolf was noticed as the author who moved the world into a new, radical, less traditional era. Woolf developed the conventions of the modernist period as her style changed subtly through each new novel that was published. The main way that this occurred in was that Virginia Woolf created inspiring impressions on her readers rather than recreating reality, and she experimented with her writing rather than conforming. Another example of how Woolf developed the conventions of the modernist period further is that she explores aspects of society that were issues at the time. She took inspiration from previous female authors such as Jane Austen and the Bronte sisters and examined women and their struggles in society. An example of this in her literary work is her creation of William Shakespeares sister, a woman named Judith. Woolf incorporated this into her extended essay A Room of Ones Own to try to get her point across about womens need for independence. Gender issues is one of Woolfs themes common to her works, along with the hierarchy of society and the consequences of war, as discussed in her novel Mrs Dalloway. The final way in which Virginia Woolf developed the conventions of the modernist period further is how she reflects her personal life within her work. Woolf had a nervous breakdown at age 13 after the death of her parents and from then on she was battling a mental illness for most of her life. This is incorporated in her work in her novel Mrs Dalloway where she incorporates most likely the experiences of herself into the character Septimus Smith who was shell-shocked from the war. Woolf imagined her novel Mrs Dalloway as a study of insanity and suicide; the world seen by the sane and the insane side by side. Mental illnesses were not something that were well known and widely accepted in Virginia Woolfs context, and Woolfs incorporation of this in her writings progressed the modernist era by the introduction of a new issue discussed. In these ways, Virginia Woolf not only used the conventions of the modernist period but developed them further. In this essay I have discussed the ways in which Virginia Woolf is regarded as one of the most significant authors of the modernist period using the two points that Virginia Woolf was influenced by events and developments to challenge the classic writing conventions, and Virginia Woolf not only used the conventions of the modernist period but developed them further.

Monday, March 9, 2020

The Iron Curtain Essay Example

The Iron Curtain Essay Example The Iron Curtain Paper The Iron Curtain Paper Attention Getter â€Å"From Stettin in the Baltic to Trieste in the Adriatic an iron curtain has descended across the continent. Behind that line lie all the capitals of the ancient states of Central and Eastern Europe. Warsaw, Berlin, Prague, Vienna, Budapest, Belgrade, Bucharest and Sofia, all these famous cities and the populations around them lie in what I must call the Soviet Sphere†- Winston Churchill, â€Å"The Sinews of Peace†. Winston Churchill’s Sinews of Peace Address, also called the Iron Curtain Speech, was provocative and very informative. His ideas were presented based on the events that shaped the world history and transformed nations into war victims trembling in the dark shadows of the World War II. To that, he called for unity among the nations; â€Å"the iron curtain† that divides Europe into the self-governing nations of the West and the Russian-led nations of the East. He called for unity among the United States and the British Commonwealth, the English-speaking Commonwealth, to elucidate the assurance of security. He called for â€Å"permanent prevention of war and the establishment of conditions of freedom and democracy as rapidly as possible in all countries† (Churchill, 1946). He was a hero for the many who had his side, the ones who supported the idea of Anglo-Saxon global domination (Harbutt, 1988). II. Audience/Ceremony The Academic Audience Winston Churchill presented the Sinews of Peace Address (Iron Curtain Speech) at Westminster College. He was introduced by President Harry S. Truman of the United States to a crowd of 40,000. In addition to the honorary award he was given, he delivered the Sinews of Peace Address, which undoubtedly was one of the most famous postwar speeches he made. B. The Iron Curtain The iron curtain is a boundary between the Eastern and Western Europe. Churchill made mention of the cities lying in this boundary. The cities were: Warsaw, Berlin, Prague, Vienna, Budapest, Belgrade, Bucharest and Sofia. The phrase â€Å"iron curtain† was popularly recognized after his delivery of the speech. The British Empire and Commonwealth and the United States The intended audiences of Churchill’s â€Å"Iron Curtain Speech† were the populations of English-speaking Commonwealth and the United States. He wanted them to hear his ideas about a world supergovernment that will provide peace and order to all. The speech also changed the classical view of the Western countries about the Soviet Communist rule of the East as well as the Germans’ and Japanese’s participation during the World War. He was an icon of the Anglo-Saxon precipatetes. D. Secondary audiences The Sinews of Peace address stimulated the audiences because of its relevance to the existing economic, political, social, and global security issues not just of the countries he mentioned but also the threat the Soviet Communist might bring in the future. It enjoyed wide circulation across the American continent and the Atlantic. To Harbutt (1988), the speech was one of the reasons that

Saturday, February 22, 2020

Law and employment Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 3250 words

Law and employment - Essay Example Analysis In the timber company, safety and other health issues were the primary issues of concern. In this particular company, it came to be established that most of the employees were not happy with the job their job and the conditions at work. The morale of the staff is actually very down. The result of this is that there is decreased productivity while the work is increasing on the other hand. There are some departments in the company where employees do not even last a year at work before they leave the organization. An example here is the gluing department. The primary reason for this shortfall is because of the grueling activities that are involved here. In most cases this results in injuries being sustained in the course of their duties. Another issue is that the members are not given orientation when they get to the company. Most of the people here have injured backs, broken fingers and even hernias. Death has also occurred in this particular department. There are several area s that need to be addressed in this particular company. The first one is to do with the work conditions of the employees. This is actually the main area which will determine whether the employees will achieve the expected results safely of not. The other area that needs to be addressed is to do with the job training of the employees. ... There is also the aspect of safety. Safety refers to the condition in which an individual knows that he or she is protected against any harm, be it physical, emotional or otherwise. It is the feeling or act of safeguarding oneself from a situation which may be perceived as undesirable especially in the case of a person’s security. There are several advantages or benefits which can be attributed to the fact that an individual is safe. One of these is the fact that a person will have peace of mind when knowing that nothing grave is going to happen to him or her. At the same time, a person is in a position to move around confidently. In a work environment, safety ensures that the employees are in a position to enact their duties well and perform up to the expected level. It is of significant essence to ensure that there are safety systems put in place in a work environment. One of the reasons for this is to be in compliance with some of the requisite standards maintained by organ izations. Safety in the firm also prevents financial or legal liability on the side of the firm. It also ensures that the workers are in a position to work well within the organization. A safety department is also charged with the responsibility of conducting checks at the work place in order to ensure the employees have the right working conditions. This department is also allocated the responsibility of identifying any flaws which may be existent in the organization with regards to aspects of safety. The customers of the firm in this case range from those who come to purchase their products in the company premises to those that are in other external markets. In the case of those who come to purchase their merchandise in the